Why are The Net Rules in A Tennis Game So Important? - documentaries-lectures.com
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Why are The Net Rules in A Tennis Game So Important?

When someone first begins playing tennis, one of the first things they learn is that the goal of the game is to hit the ball so that it goes over the net.

Your first adversary in a tennis match will be the net. If you cannot knock the ball over the net, your competitor will not need to put in any effort to win the match against you. On the other hand, no regulation prohibits striking around the goal post, which is the topic that we will go over today.

Case 1: When A Player Touches The Net:

The point is immediately given to the opponent whenever a player touches the net, net post, strap, or single sticks with any portion of the body, clothes, or racket (regardless of whether or not it is in their hands at the time).

There are certain situations where it is almost impossible to avoid doing this, such as when you are rushing towards the goal to take a shot, and your momentum takes you into it.

If the point has already finished before a player hits the net, the point may still count as a winner as long as the ball has spun twice or landed beyond the court after the first swing. This is the only circumstance in which this rule can be broken.

Case 2: Hitting Around the Net, Is it Illegal?

Because there are no restrictions on the height of the ball in tennis, it is perfectly acceptable to hit the ball around the net post. This is because the rulebook does not stipulate that the ball must travel higher than the net’s height for the shot to be considered legal. The sole condition that must be met is that the ball must fall inside the playing area of the court (singles or doubles lines, depending on what you are playing).

A ball is considered a “good return” if it is “came back outside the net bars, either or below the height of the bottom of the net, even if it hits the net posts, providing that it reaches the ground in the proper court,” according to the official ITF Rulebook. In other words, for the ball to be regarded “excellent,” it must be delivered in one of two ways.

Case 3: Reaching Around and Hitting Shot:

In tennis, players cannot cross or reach over the net with their rackets. You can’t do anything until the ball has arrived at your half of the court first.

This doesn’t apply only if the ball falls on your side of the court but then bounces over the net and onto the opposing side because of the spin on the game or the wind. In such a case, you get the point.

Hope you enjoyed the three cases. For some more in-depth rules, please check out the guides at mytennisoutfitter. They will explain the over-the-net rules in great detail with a lot more examples and facts to show why they are so important in Tennis.